Want To Catch Big Bass? You Have To Fish For Them!

Yes, we all want to catch big bass and catch that once in a lifetime bass but most anglers just don’t fish for them. They fish where the average size bass are located but not the monster bass. Then the angler wonders why he doesn’t catch the fish he wants to catch.

A big bass isn’t going to be out in the open. for sure. Matter of fact, most anglers will never ever get near a monster when fishing. They are too worried about catching bass and just fish where the average size bass feeds and lives. Yes, they fish structure, weeds, stumps and etc. but that is not where the pigs are feeding. The anglers have read so much about bass fishing they think that is where to fish for big bass.
It’s NOT!

Confused? You’re not alone, so are hundreds of thousands other bass anglers. Do you really think the lunkers got big by being out in the open where other small bass are feeding? Yeah, you’ll catch a nice bass every so often but you’re not catching big bass on a regular basis. Big bass are going to be in deep cover, some bass have never seen a lure even because anglers don’t go where they are located.

Big bass are going to be located in the thickest, heaviest cover you can find or even imagine. They are going to stay close to that cover most of their lives. Some will never see a lure because anglers won’t go where they are or don’t know where they are in the lake they are fishing. You can fish a whole lake and never come close to a monster bass.

I know an angler and have fished with him that catches nice size bass regularly. Other anglers just can’t believe how he catches monster bass all the time. So, why does he catch the pigs while other anglers are catching nothing? Because he fishes for them! He fishes where they are, he goes in places where most anglers don’t even think of going and fishing. He fishes lures that resemble the prey the bass are eating. He imitates the prey with his retrieve and does everything he can to make that lure look real.

If the bass are eating craws, why throw a lure that is 10 inches long? How does that imitate what the bass are eating? If the bass are feeding on shad then why throw a craw? Listen, bass have lived where they are most of their lives, they know what is natural in their environment. If something is out of place then the bass is going to know that and be cautious about being around it. Bass didn’t get their size because they just fed on anything that came along. If their environment changes then they are not going to feed… period.

Another thing is big bass aren’t going to chase your lure like you think they will go after it. The guy who catches the big bass on a regular basis fishes his lure so slow that you think he fell asleep. It might take him 10 minutes to get his lure back to the boat. He wants to keep his lure in front of the big bass’ face for as long as he can keep it there. Why does he do that? To temp the bass into striking longer.

I fish the same way, I fish the heaviest, thickest cover I can find. I put my lure right where the cover is the thickest and then wait. After awhile I will move the lure and move it slow. I learned this a long time ago and noticed when I fish like this I catch more nice bass and you will too. I fish from shore a lot and have had dozen of boating anglers come over and ask what I was using as a lure. I would tell them and even show them my lure. What they didn’t realize was it didn’t matter if I showed them the lure or not if they didn’t have the technique to go along with it. Next time you’re out on your favorite lake, look around, look under trees, look for the thickest cover in the lake and try fishing it. Fish where others don’t fish or even think about going to find cover. Try it! You’ll be surprised!

Ways to Tell You Are Serving Correctly in Volleyball

Consistent, accurate serving is the objective of every volleyball player – from youth to Olympic team member. To reach that point, however, it’s important to know if you are serving correctly. Here are some ways to do that.

The first way to tell whether you are serving correctly is whether the ball is going where you want it to go. I know that sounds very simplistic, but the reality of things is that proper mechanics tends to result in high levels of accuracy. If you are consistently hitting your target then chances are pretty good you’ve got things right. That said, chances are you’re reading this article because you aren’t as accurate or powerful a server as you’d like, so let me provide you with some checkpoints you can use to get yourself on track.

Are you finishing your serve balanced? If not, there’s something wrong. Usually, it comes down to your toss. If you toss the ball too far to the left or right you’ll end up leaning in that direction to try to make proper ball contact. Either that or you’ll be serving the ball in that direction when you didn’t intend to do so. If you find your weight well onto your front toes, then you’ve tossed the ball too far forward, while having to arch your back and lean backwards means a toss behind your ideal contact point. All of this can be fixed by improving your toss.

Is the ball spinning when you want it to float, or floating when you want it to spin? That is a function of your ball contact. You need to make sure you’re stricking the right part of the ball in the correct way to get the desired effect.

Is the ball coming landing short or going too far? Distance in serving is all about the speed of your hand at contact. Swing your arm faster to hit the ball farther (notice I didn’t say swing harder). Swing your arm slower to hit the ball shorter. Make sure to keep your ball contact firm, though. No floppy wrist or mushy hand!

Does your shoulder hurt when you serve? If so, it probably means your arm swing is off in some fashion – assuming you don’t simply have an injury from something else, of course. This again could be related to ball toss, but it could also be a function of your mechanics. This might be hard to judge by yourself, though. You’ll likely want the help of a coach in evaluating your arm swing – or at least the use of video.

Which brings up perhaps the best way to gauge whether you are serving properly. Video yourself serving and compare it to video of someone who serves properly. There are many tools out there these days that allow for side-by-side analysis. This will let you see how your technique stacks up against the good server in the areas of body posture, arm preparation, toss, footwork, and follow-through.

Hopefully you have a coach who is keeping an eye on your serving technique and helping you correct things as needed. If not, though, the tips here should help you identify problems and put you on a path toward more effective serving.