3 Tips for Being a Leader on the Volleyball Court

Leadership is something all teams need for success, but it’s not always something easily defined or developed. We can’t say do this and do that and you’ll be a great leader for your volleyball team. Here are a few tips to help you move in that direction, though.

Tip #1: Be a model player

A leader need not be the best player on a team, but they do need to represent its ideals. This is mainly about attitude and effort. Leaders turn up on time and follow team rules – written and unwritten. They work at least as hard as everyone else. They don’t complain or whine, but instead get on with what needs to be done. Leaders don’t make excuses. They also respect the coach(es) and everyone else associated with the team. I could go on, but I think you probably get the idea.

All of this may sound like stuff that isn’t part of on-court leadership, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. It is the foundation of being the person the other players look to when it’s competition time. A leader doesn’t just turn up for match day and have everyone follow them. They earn that right by what they do in training, at meetings, during strength & conditioning work – basically in every facet of being part of the team.

Tip #2: Communicate

It doesn’t take a loud voice and a constant stream of chatter to be a good leader, but it does take the ability to communicate with teammates. Talking is the most obvious example of this, and all leaders do need to be able to speak at the right time and in the right manner for the circumstances. Communication can just as importantly come from a look, a pat on the back, or a gesture, though. It’s about being connected with teammates and making sure everyone is on the same page.

Tip #3: Put the team first

You cannot be a good team leader and a prima donna at the same time. A strong leader is focused on the team’s objectives, not on their own. Even if they are the best player, a leader nevertheless keeps the focus on the team, not on their own performance. They don’t let their own success or failure individually impact how they interact with their teammates, knowing it’s the team’s success which is what’s important at the end of the day. This is perhaps the hardest part of on-court leadership as we all tend to get caught up in how we are playing, especially if we’re struggling. A good captain puts that aside for the sake of the team.

Think of the word respect and how someone earns it. That will take you a long way toward understanding what you need to do to be a good on-court leader for your volleyball team. Leadership starts with respect. Everything else builds from there.

How to Execute a Bowling Hook

Having learnt the basics of getting the ball to roll straight down the lane, and having grasped the basics of bowling as a sport, it is quite in order for you to learn some few tricks here and there that will not only add spice to the whole experience, but will also give you the chance to score more points. Throwing a bowling hook is not the preserve of any other bowling ball. There are those that have the right texture and spin for excellent execution of the technique. It is worth noting that there are different types of bowling hooks that are the stroker, cranker, and helicopter.

Each of them has a different mode of execution but we will first deal with the moments of doing a bowling hook.

The hook ball allows you to hit as much pins as possible since it involves putting some small spin on your ball and the secret lies in how well you release the bowling ball. With the right amount of spin applied to the ball as it is being released, it is supposed to travel in a straight line before getting to the break point, this is where it is supposed to turn towards the target, before gradually arching out and head straight towards the pins that you are trying to hit.

However, a perfect bowling hook is again dependent on axis rotation and axis tilt habits. These may sound somewhat strange but they simply refer to the amount of horizontal and vertical spins that you tend to put on your shots. The best way to be able to gauge the manner in which you are doing this is to simply get someone else watch as you throw the shots. It is therefore important that you try to learn the different types of bowling balls, as they will considerably add value. To your game through being able to pull off some of the best bowling hooks. Having learnt the bowling basics, it is quite in order for you to get to know the different types of hooks and how they are applied in different circumstances.

In the stroker, your sliding foot is supposed to stop just before the ball gets to the bottom of the swing, ensuring moderate ball reaction through creating the right leverage. Your shoulders should be so square at the release point. When doing the cranker, make sure your both feet are to the approach’s left hand side and it requires getting to the foul line before the ball. You first plant your foot before pulling your arm through, making sure that your elbow is bent keeping the hand below, and under the ball and making sure that, the shoulders are left open for maximum leverage. However, since it involves a lot of movements, it can easily cause muscle injury. Just as the name suggests, the helicopter hook leaves the bowling ball rotating like the machine’s propeller. Here you should bring your fingers all the way round the top of the ball making it travel down the straight lane but spinning even more.

Enjoy Your Alaska Fishing Experience

Alaska’s fishing holidays are among the hottest with vacationers. With folks wanting to flee their day by day life, these luxurious fishing holidays are a good way to can get nearer to nature.

Salmon is frequent alongside the Alaskan coast. So is massive halibut. Guest may also catch salmon weighing as much as 50 pounds and king salmon over 50 pounds are under no circumstances unusual. Grayling and northern pike are very simple to catch in lots of inland streams. And you’ll fish alongside a few of the most unimaginable surroundings on the continent.

To make certain, it’s far from perfect. The productivity of most Alaska streams just isn’t high as compared with those in hotter climes. Which means that some heavily fished streams don’t rapidly produce many massive fish, notably in the Interior. Massive salmon runs compensate in lots of streams, nevertheless.

The acute tides and ocean currents surrounding Alaska creates the ideally suited habitats for baitfish, which in turn entice returning salmon and bottom fish in astounding numbers. Alaska promotes fishing as its predominant sporting occasion. Giant numbers of vacationers visit the place to participate in this adventurous sport.

South-central Alaska is home to probably the most well-known fishing areas within the state. Coastal waters and watersheds embody the place with diversified land and seascapes. Along with salmon and halibut, different fish like trout, pike, grayling, Dolly Varden, burbot, whitefish and different species may be discovered year-round within the many watersheds that form the primary vacationer sights.

Southeast Alaska, typically known as the “panhandle,” is a land of deep fjords, speeding mountain streams and glaciers. A lot of the land is within the Tongass Nationwide Forest. Summers are cool and moist; winters are cooler and snowy, however a lot less chilly than other parts of Alaska not warmed by the ocean. Salmon return in massive numbers to thousands of streams. Halibut move close to the shore waters in the summertime. A number of species of trout can be found. A wide range of bottom fish may be caught. Shrimp and crab may be present in some waters.

Lower Cook Inlet is also a well-liked fishing vacation spot in the summertime months. Clams, halibut and salmon hold the anglers busy all through the day. The Kuskokwim and Yukon rivers drain most of the Interior, Arctic and Western Alaska, which is sparsely coated by timber. Grayling are most widespread within the area, together with trout, pike, burbot, char and shellfish.

Differences Between Indoor and Outdoor Volleyball

Volleyball is a sport beloved by many and can easily be played year-round. However, if you have the chance to hit the court outdoors when the weather’s good, why wouldn’t you try to get in some fresh air and sunshine while you play the game you love?

There are differences between indoor and outdoor (sometimes called “sand”) volleyball. These differences are not enough to be real game-changers, but there are some things to be aware of depending on your volleyball environment.

The Volleyball Court

Sand volleyball courts and indoor courts are fairly different in size. Beach courts are actually smaller than indoor courts. Indoor courts have a rule where players in the back row cannot advance behind a certain point in the court to hit the ball, whereas sand volleyball players can hit the ball from anywhere on their side of the net. The reasoning behind the smaller sand court size may be that getting any traction and running in sand is much more difficult than on a hard surface. A smaller court keeps the ball in play longer, keeping rallies more entertaining and face-paced.

Players Per Team

With the larger court size for indoor volleyball, it reasons that a larger amount of people would be needed to cover the area. Indoor volleyball requires six players per team, or side. Each player has a specialized position that rotates and switches throughout the game. Sand volleyball is usually played with two-person teams. One player hits from the left side of the court, one hits from the right. The serve is rotated between the two players. There are no specialized positions and each player is usually well-versed in all hits, blocks and digs. At competition-level sand volleyball, players can have dedicated positions such as one may block and one may dig, but both could still hit.

The Volleyball

The ball itself is one of the differences between indoor and outdoor volleyball. Indoor balls are made of leather and are somewhat heavier than balls used outdoors. These heavier indoor balls can be hit harder and tend to move more quickly than an outdoor ball. Sand volleyballs are bigger, softer and less heavy than indoor balls. The lighter weight helps them float through the air better, allowing more experienced players to use the weather to their advantage.

Keeping Score

Indoor volleyball has matches made up of five sets or games. Games are played until the first team reaches 25 points, and are declared the winners of that game. Three sets win the match. If both teams have won two sets, a tiebreaker game is played to 15 points. Teams switch sides after each game.

Sand volleyball has matches made up of only three sets or games. Games are played until the first team reaches 21 points, and if a tiebreaker game is necessary, it is played until 15 points.

In both versions, a game must be won by a minimum two-point margin.

Touches

The way the ball is touched or handled by players is different between the two types of games. Indoor volleyball allows players to block the ball without it counting as one of the three allowed hits for each team. Sand volleyball counts a block as one of the three hits allowed.

Indoor volleyball also allows open-hand tips, or dinks, which send the ball just slightly over the net, however sand volleyball does not allow these types of moves.

If you enjoy volleyball, then it probably doesn’t matter whether you play it indoors or outdoors. In fact you may find that you do prefer one way over the other, but just getting to play the game you love any time of year is a big benefit. Educating yourself about both versions of the sport will help your game-play, and hopefully your enjoyment of the sport as well.

Five Accessories to Get You Started With Bowfishing

Year after year the interest in bowfishing grows. I mean, what better way for you to practice your hunting form when you are not able to be out in the woods? The good thing for you, is that if you have a compound, or a recurve bow already, you can add a few parts to your bow and you will be good to go. The manufacturers of the bowfishing accessories have made most of their items compatible with standard pre-fabricated holes on your riser. The following, quick bullet list will cover the items that you would need to hit the ground (or boat) running.

  • A durable and dependable reel
  • A bow–if you don’t have one already
  • An arrow rest
  • Bowfishing points
  • Bowfishing arrows

I have to start with the reel, because you do not want to skimp on one of the most important pieces of your bowfishing gear. The reel can make or break your trip if it fails. This is why I suggest getting something like the AMS Retriever Reel Pro. This is great if you are just starting out because there are no buttons that you would have to push to take the shot. Once you are more experienced, you can get a standard fishing reel to mimic this same effect. Fishing line that is anywhere from 80 pounds to 150 pounds is optimal to have in your reel.

The archery bow should be a no-brainer. If you are interested in shooting in bowfishing tournaments, then it is best option for you is to get a dedicated bowfishing-rig. Most of the options that are on the market are going to have a blue finish on them. There are offerings out there from many manufacturers but I like the selections from Darton, Parker, Cajun, and PSE. In my opinion, they offer the best “bang for your buck.” Keep the poundage and the let-off in mind when making your selection.

The arrow rest is the easiest choice on this list. You can get a brush rest, like the whisker biscuit, or you can get a twister arrow rest. The only thing that you need to be aware of, is that the arrows for bowfishing are on the heavier end, so durability is key. Plastic is okay, but aluminum or steel is preferred given the weight of the arrows.

Bowfishing points should stay locked in place. One of the biggest issues that I used to have when I would head out to the water is that my points would come loose fairly easily. When purchasing, always ask questions to make certain that the points that you choose will stand up to the abuse that you will be putting them through. I have found that tempered stainless steel is a good option. Double check the size of your shafts so that you know the point will work. You also want to check the barbs; Once you shoot the fish, you don’t want it to get away because of flimsy hooks.

When you get your arrows, you want to make sure that you get something that is going to have high visibility. These are different from archery bow arrows. That is one reason why these arrows are white. These arrows are going to be longer than most–the arrows that I use are 33-34”. This is why you need to take into account the arrow rest that you have chosen. Whatever arrow you get, I suggest that you do not cut them down. The heavier the arrow is, the better. This will allow it to get through the water much more effectively.

Getting your bow setup can seem like a daunting task, but I assure you that it is not. If you know what you should be looking for, then it will be a breeze. As I mentioned earlier, you can transform most of your old [or current] bows into bowfishing bows in no time. If you are looking to take on this sport, then I would suggest that you get a dedicated setup. The reason for this is that you are going to have to continually change and tune the archery accessories that are on your bow before each outing. This could end up being a hassle.