Beach Fishing: Your Fun As Beginners

To help you have a great beach fishing experience, we are going to explain how you should read a beach, what kind of fishing tackle to use and some basic fishing techniques to follow!

Find your beach spot

Beach fishing does require an ability to read water action, colour and current. It’s always a good idea to pick a high vantage point to help you assess the beach before you start.

You can often see the movement of the currents and particularly look out for dark areas which may indicate a gutter or hole that could be the perfect spot to cast your line into.

The right weather conditions

It’s always more enjoyable to try beach fishing on a bright, clear day. Foggy or windy conditions may mean you come across obstacles, so it’s probably best to avoid this type of weather, particularly if you’re just starting out.

Choosing your tackle

When it comes to a novice angler, a light rod with soft tip is always good when targeting small fish. This allows excellent action, enabling the bait to smoothly swim and act.

For example, a light, 10ft long beach rod on a spin outfit with leader around 3ft or 4ft would be a good choice. Using a running sinker rig means it will move around more freely and cover more area but keep your bait at the bottom, which is what you want.

Baiting up

The bait you use is very important and while it will depend on the fish you are targeting, fresh beach worms are often a good choice, particularly if you are hoping to hook a whiting, trevally or bream.

You’ll also need to think about the hook you use for your bait. Using a long shank hook will make it easier to thread the worms on. Try threading the worm on the hook by going in and out of the worm so it sits along the shank but ensure the hook end is exposed. You want to make sure you get a good hold on your fish when it bites!

Time to get fishing

After picking the spot where you’re going to fish and getting your tackle ready, it’s time to get started. You don’t need to necessarily cast a long way out, again have a look at the water and try and target the holes and gutters where the fish may be feeding.

When you are on a fish, try to avoid walking backwards as most beaches slope up and you risk falling over and may lose your fish and tension on the line. You might also notice a strong resistance with the wave movement. Once your fish is hooked, do not pull it too hard. Let the waves wash the fish in for you. Wait, hold it and let the waves do their job.

Important tips

The waves will often push your rig towards the beach as they roll in and may mean that you lose contact periodically, just work with the waves and don’t try to grip your rod. This shouldn’t affect you being able to feel the fish once you hook one. It is also advisable to wear a pair of polarised sunglasses. You can see different colours in water, shallow bank or deeper green edge. You can also see how the waves are breaking, and on a clear day you may even see the fish in the water. It’s pretty cool.

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